Keep
Cultural History Project
Cottages

 

Cottages of Mount Desert Island

part of the Mount Desert Island Cultural History Project

(updated 11 May 2014)

 

Welcome

to the Cottages of Mount Desert Island home page, part of the Mount Desert Island Cultural History Project.

Purpose of this web page:

The purpose of this web page is to present information about Mount Desert Island’s named cottages. If little is known about a cottage, it will be reported below. If a picture becomes available or when substantially more information is learned, a separate web page will be created for that cottage and a link will be provided below. Much of the information below comes from Lost Bar Harbor by G. W. Helfrich and Gladys O’Neil, Bar Harbor: A Town Almost Lost by Deborah M. Dyer, microfilm and online copies of early newspapers of Mount Desert Island, and notebooks in the Bar Harbor Historical Society. Owners of record in 1904 are from maps “compiled from Atlas of Bar Harbor & Vicinity published by Summer Residents Association”.

How to contribute:

All information (including images) should be e-mailed to erin.earlyward@mdihistory.org or sent by traditional mail to MDI Cottages, c/o Mount Desert Island Historical Society; P. O. Box 653; Mount Desert, ME 04660.


Click on the name of the town you are interested in, or scroll down to see information for all the towns on Mount Desert Island.


 

Bar Harbor

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Abendruh – north side of Albert Street (now [2014] Albert Meadow)
1887 March 17 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Abendruh, Mrs. M. E. Farnum’s cottage, on Albert avenue, will be repainted by Moore & Pendleton this spring.” (p. 3, col. 1)
1904: owned by Edith (Mrs. Leonard E.) Opdycke
Acadia – Eden Street
[years?]: owned by a Biddle, a Baker, and a Hoffman
Aldersea – east side of lower Main Street
1874: designed by George W. Orff
1904: owned by Edward Coles
1904: additions designed by Frederick L. Savage
Allison Cottage
Aloha – oceanfront, access from west side of Bridge Street
1904: owned by Mrs. Robert B. Potter
Am Meer – Shore Path; accessed (in 1904) via a driveway from Wayman Lane
1904: owned by John I. Kane
Amberside – Hulls Cove
1906: designed by Frederick L. Savage for Frank T. Howard
Anchorage, The – southeast corner of Prospect Avenue and Union Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. Edith S. Whitney estate
later owners:
Mrs. Gerald Borden
Mr. Hancock Griffer
Arcadia – south side of Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Mrs. DeGrasse Fox
later owned by S. Magargee Wright
Archbold Cottage – west side of Cleftstone Road
Ardeen – Cleftstone Road
1904: owned by Mrs. Platt-Hunt
As You Like It
1904: owned by Mrs. Mary I. Higgins
Ash Cottage – Holland Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. J. Madison Taylor
Atlantean – 11 Atlantic Avenue
brief history of the land prior to purchase by Frederick L. Savage
1887 July 9: George W. Hamilton purchased the land that would eventually be the location of the Atlantean from Thomas H. Swazey, Frederick H. Moses, and Edward Swazey (Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 216, pages 442–444).
1888 November 12: George W. Hamilton mortgaged the land, along with four other parcels, to Luere B. Deasey, John T. Higgins, George [H.?] Grant, and Fred C. Lynam (231:343–348).
1889 June 26: George [H.?] Grant sold his portion of this mortgage to Deasey, Higgins, and Lynam, along with 13 other mortgages that he held with them (237:44–46).
1889 September 9: The above mortgage was foreclosed on (237:522–524), with the property going to the mortgage holders (Deasey, Higgins, and Lynam).
1894 May 20: John T. Higgins died. Addie B. Dalrymple, the residuary legatee under his will, inherited his share of this mortgage (and, presumably, the 13 others).
1902 April 23: land (24,597 square feet) purchased by Frederick L. Savage (from Lynam, Deasey, and Dalrymple [see above]; 376:218–220); sale included “all buildings thereon except the ice house which is the personal property of a tenant”.
1903: built for Frederick L. Savage; article (part 1, part 2, part 3, part 4, part 5) in Bar Harbor Record, Wednesday, 9 April 1903, page 1, columns 5 and 6
1956 September 18: purchased by L. Everett Gerrish and Kathleen F. Gerrish from Harold P. Whitmore, who was acting as a guardian of Alice R. Savage, Frederick L. Savage’s second wife, who was “a person of unsound mind” (Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 793, pages 142–144)
Atlantique – 45 Hancock Street
designed by Frederick L. Savage
1904: built for John Innes Kane (a grandson of John Jacob Astor)
1992: placed on National Registry
2000: restored
2007 September 4: cottage
2014: extant
Auchincloss Cottage – Cleftstone
Audley Cottage
1904: owned by Miss Elizabeth C. Washington
Austin Cottage – Wayman Lane
Bagatelle – Eden Street
1904: owned by Mrs. Edmund Pendleton
Balance Rock – Shore Path, accessed in 1904 from Albert Avenue (now [2014] Albert Meadow)
1904: owned by Alexander Maitland
2007 September 4: cottage/inn (partial view)
2009 November 22: cottage/inn (whole view)
2011 December 12: entrance side [photo by Doug Tuttle]
2014: extant (as Balance Rock Inn)
Baltimore Cottage – Locust Lane
Bandbox – Cottage Street
1904: owned by John Hone
1907 November 6: “Mr. John Hone is having a fine granite cellar wall placed under The Bandbox on Cottage Street. George L. Wescott is doing this work.” (The Bar Harbor Record, 6 November 1907, p. 1, col 3)
Ban-y-Byrn
designed by S. V. Stratton
1888–1889: built for Albert Clifford Barney of Cincinnati
1930: purchased by Joseph Wholean
1947: burned
1904: owned by A. C. Barney estate
Barberry Ledge – west side of Cleftstone Road
Barnacles, The – east side of Eden Street but not oceanfront property
1904: owned by Edmund Pendleton
Bass Cottage – The Field
Bass Cottage – Kebo Street
Baymeath – Hulls Cove
designed by Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul of Boston
1895–1896: built for Mrs. Louise DeKoven Bowen (Mrs. Joseph T. Bowen)
1904: owned by Joseph T. Bowen
1979: torn down
Beachcroft – east side of lower Main Street, shared driveway with Larchsea
1904: owned by C. Morton Smith
[date?]: cottage (from image in 1919 publication Who’s Who at the leading Watering Resorts in Maine, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
Beau Desert – east side of Eden Street
1881: designed by William R. Emerson of Boston
1904: owned by Augustus C. and Miss Gurnee
[year?]: torn down
Bide-a-while – along former portion of Shore Path (which ends now [2014] at Wayman Lane); driveway access from Barberry Lane
1904: owned by J. L. Ketterlinus
1907 November 6: “[A]t Mr. J. L. Ketterlinus’ Bide-a-While, Contractor R. H. Moon has quite a piece of work.” (The Bar Harbor Record, 6 November 1907, p. 1, col 3)
Bierka – 7 Stephens Lane
1904: owned by Augustus Franzen
2009 November 21: cottage
2014: extant
Birch Point – Shore Path
1868: built
1904: owned by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy
1938: torn down in 1938
Bird Cage – north side of Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Mrs. Mary D. Biddle estate
Bird Cottage – [Holland Avenue?]
Birnam – Highbrook Road (Bloomfield Road)
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1892–1893: built for Charles Fry of Manchester, Massachusetts
1904: owned by Mrs. Charles Fry
ca. 1945: torn down
Blair Eyrie – Highbrook Road
1888: built by Sidney V. Stratton of Frank Quinby Associates for George Wheeler; originally called Avamaya
1901: purchased by DeWitt Clinton Blair of New York
ca. 1935 – torn down
[year?]: Summit House built on this site
2007 September 4: gate, gatepost
2013: Summit House torn down
2013–2014: hotel built on site
Blake Lodge
Bogue Chitto – Hulls Cove
designed by W. H. Day
1888: completed for John A. Morris
1904: owned by John A. Morris estate
ca. 1961: torn down
Boscobel – West Street
1887: built for James E. Foster
Boulder, The west side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by John H. Livingston
Bournemouth – Eden Street
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1885–1886: built for W. B. Walley of Boston
later owned by Mrs. Archibald Cary Harrison
1925: purchased by Mrs. Robert Hall McCormick Jr.
1979: torn down
Bowling Green – east side of Eden Street but not oceanfront property
1904: owned by Mrs. Enid Hunt Slater (aunt of Kurt Diederich, in whose memory she funded the memorial path “Kurt Diederich’s Climb”)
1923 March: purchased by Arthur Ryle; article, in The Bar Harbor Times, Wednesday, 30 March 1923; page 1, column 5
later owned by Ethel N. Torrey
2007 September 4: capstone
Breakwater, The – Shore Path (45 Hancock Street)
designed by Fred Savage
1904: built for John Innes Kane
Breeze, The – 125 West Street (north side)
1896: built for Mrs. A. P. Peabody
1904: owned by Mrs. A. P. Peabody
2009 November 22: cottage
2014: extant
Briarbound
1904: owned by William W. White
Briarfield – corner of Cottage Street and High Street
1904: owned by R. C. Church
Briars, The Shore Path, accessed in 1904 from Barberry Lane
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1881: built for Joshua Montgomery Sears of Boston
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mr. Sears house will be called Briar Cottage.” (p. 1, col. 3)
1904: owned by Joshua Montgomery Sears
1908 (summer): rented by John D. Rockefeller Jr. (and his son Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller was born there)
1909: purchased by Thomas F. Walsh for his daughter Evalyn and her husband, Edward Beale “Ned” McLean and renamed Briar Cliffe (report of sale in 12 December 1909 issue of The Bar Harbor Record, p. 1, col. 4)
[date?]: cottage (from image in 1919 publication Who’s Who at the leading Watering Resorts in Maine, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
1968: torn down, except a servants’ wing that was converted into a guest house
Brigham Cottage – Schooner Head Road
Brook End – east side of Eden Street, south of the mouth of Duck Brook
Brookside – Hulls Cove
Buena Vista
1881: built
1904: alterations designed by Frederick L. Savage
1904: owned by James T. Hinch estate
Buonriposo – Eden Street
designed by Ernesto Fabbri
1904 built for Ernesto Fabbri
1918: burned
1919: rebuilt
1963: torn down
Buoy, The – north side of West Street
1896: purchased by A. Bleecker Banks, article in Bar Harbor Record, Tuesday, 25 August 1896, page 4, column 5
Burnmouth – east of Eden Street
1904: owned by Mrs. Archibald Harrison
Callendar House – west side of Schooner Head Road, bordered on the north by Bear Brook
designed by Frederick L. Savage
1901 April 16: burned prior to completion
1904: owned by Mrs. John C. Livingston
Canary Cottage – west side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by Mrs. Geraldyn Redmond
Canoe Point owned by:
[…] Prime
[…] Renshaw
Scott Lane
Casa Far Niente – north side of West Street
designed by Bruce Pierce
1882: built for William B. Rice
1904: owned by William B. Rice estate
1925: purchased by Edward Porter May
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
1943: torn down
Cedars, The – corner of Bloomfield Road and Devon Road
1904: owned by George W. Guthrie
Chantier – south side of West Street
1904: owned by Miss Julia Stevens
Chatwold – east side of Schooner Head Road; immediately south of Bear Brook
1892 August 4: advertised for sale, from The Bar Harbor Record, page 4, column 3
1893 (June): owned by Louisa Bowler Livingston
1893 (June): leased by Joseph Pulitzer
1894 May 30: purchased by Joseph Pulitzer (Hancock County Registry of Deeds 284:4–6)
1895: accidental death of worker; article (part 1, part 2), from Bar Harbor Record, Wednesday, 15 May 1895, page 13, column 3
1895: remodeled by Joseph Pulitzer; article (part 1, part 2), from Bar Harbor Record, Wednesday, 9 October 1895, page 1, column 3
1904: owned by Joseph Pulitzer
[date?]: cottage (from online image of old postcard)
1945: torn down
Chiltern – east side of Main Street, along south side of Cromwell Harbor Brook
1895 September 24: land purchase by Edgar T. Scott; article (part 1, part 2), from Bar Harbor Record, Saturday, 28 September 1895, page 1, column 3
designed by William Longfellow of Boston
1896: plans drawn by Philadelphia architect William Cope; article, from Bar Harbor Record, Tuesday, 25 August 1896, page 4, column 2
1904: owned by Edgar T. Scott
[year?]: torn down
Clearfield – 17 Albert Meadow
1887: built
1904: owned by Mary (Mrs. Morris) Longstreth
2009 November 21: cottage
2014: extant
Cleftstone Cottage – west side of Eden Street
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Miss Aurora Grelaud, of Boston, is visiting Mrs. Nathan Matthews at Cleftstone cottage.” (p. 1, col. 3)
1904: owned by Frank Ellis
Clover Cottage – 96 Cottage Street, corner of Cottage Street and Ash Place
1904: owned by Mrs. Caroline S. Leffingwell
Clovercroft – east side of Eden Street
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1883–1884: built for George and Iphynia G. (Livor) Place of New York
1939 September 7: advertisement in The Bar Harbor Times (page 5, columns 7 and 8)
1947: burned
2007 September 4: capstone
Colonial Hall – north side of Prospect Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. Mary T. Armour and Mrs. Louise Este King
later owned by Brook Fenno
Columbia Cottage – The Field
1904: owned by J. P. Bass
Columbia Cottage – Stephens Lane
Corfield – east side of Eden Street
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1893: built for Mrs. George P. Bowler of Cincinnati
1904: owned by Robert Pendleton Bowler
1907 November 6: “At Corfield, Mr. Robert Pendleton Bowler’s estate, changes evidently to be made in the position of the driveway, are already staked out, and awaiting the workmen.” (The Bar Harbor Record, 6 November 1907, p. 1, col 3)
1922: purchased by William Cooper Procter
ca. 1965: torn down
Cornersmeet – southeast corner of Kebo Street and Mount Desert Street
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
1947: burned
Cover Farm – Hulls Cove
owned by:
Mrs. Olive Tilton
Mrs. John Thayer
[…] Frazier
Cragsend – south side of Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Mrs. Mary D. Biddle estate
Cra(i)gs, The – Spring Street
designed by Bruce Price
1879–1880: built for Robert Amory, a physician, lecturer, and medical researcher. Born in Brookline, he moved to Boston with his second wife and raised his family there. The family was quite affluent in corporate finance, cotton mills, and trade. Robert’s mother was a Copley, and he was the great-grandson of John Singleton Copley, the portrait artist of Boston, famous for painting John Adams, Sam Adams, Paul Revere, and others, and for whom Copley Square is named. (Copley’s father-in-law, Richard Clarke is connected to the Boston Tea Party.)—biographical information contributed by Ron Lecours, who lives with his wife in a building once owned by Robert Amory
1946: torn down
Crossways, The – corner of West Street and Holland Avenue
1904: owned by William B. Rice estate
Crowsnest – north side of Wayman Lane
1904: owned by Mary I. (Mrs. Robert) Emmons
Davis Cottage
Denison Cottage – Prospect Avenue
Devilstone – Shore Path; accessed (in 1904) via a driveway from east end of Hancock Street
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1885: built for Mrs. George Bowler
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mrs. Wm. H. Vanderbilt and her son George arrived on the morning train yesterday. They will occupy the “Devilstone” cottage as usual.” (p. 1, col. 4)
later owned by James T. Woodward of New York
later owned by Mrs. Thomas A. Scott
1901: wing designed by Frederick L. Savage
1904: owned by Mary S. (Mrs. Clement B.) Newbold (daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Scott)
later owned by Miss Frances Coleman who changed its name to Eaglestone
1928: wing added
1968: main section torn down; wing remains
Devon – south side of Eagle Lake Road
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1888: built
[year?]: owned by H. C. Wilkins
1904: owned by H. C. Wilkins estate
later owned by Harold Peabody
1947: burned
Donaque – east side if Cleftstone Road
designed by Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul of Boston
1893–1894: built for A. Howard Hinckle of Cincinnati
1894 August 25: reception held, reported in Bar Harbor Record, Wednesday, 29 August 1894, page 1, column 3
1904: owned by A. Howard Hinkle
ca. 1939: torn down
Dust Pan Cottage – east side of Eden Street
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1886: built for Rufus King of Cincinnati
later owned by Mrs. W. E. Montgomery
later owned by James Cunningham
1947: burned
Dutch Cottage – Kebo Street
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
Eagle Cliff – ocean side of what is now [2014] Oldfarm Road
1904: owned by Mrs. Lea McI. Luquer
Eaglestone – see Devilstone
Eastcote
1904: owned by Mrs. J. Pierrepont Edwards
Eden Brook – non-ocean side of Eden Street
1903: built for Amos R. E. Pinchot
later owned by Elizabeth Hudson
1947: burned
Eden Hall – Shore Path; accessed (in 1904) via a driveway from east end of Atlantic Avenue, the driveway shared with Edgemere and Wayside
origin of name: article (part 1, part 2, part 3) published in The Bar Harbor Times, Wednesday, 30 June 1926, page 8, column 4
1904: owned by Frances E. (Mrs. Thomas B.) Musgrave
Edenbrae
1904: owned by Mrs. Louise K. Wilson and Mrs. S. S. Kimball Constable
Edgefield – The Field
1904: owned by Mrs. F. N. Goddard
Edgemere – near Shore Path; accessed (in 1904) via a driveway from east end of Atlantic Avenue, the driveway shared with Eden Hall and Wayside
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1881: built for Thomas B. Musgrave
1904: owned by Frances E. (Mrs. Thomas B.) Musgrave
later owned by William Sherman, Chester Barnett, and Beatrix (Jones) Farrand
1938: torn down
Edgewater – Schooner Head
1899–1900 – built by Edward B. Mears for Charles Francis of Boston; “The plans for this house were made in Mr. Mears’ office, and through the courtesy of Mr. T. M. Merryweather, who has had much to do with their preparation, a [Bar Harbor] Record representative was permitted to examine them. The house is situated about east and west, and the general dimensions are 37 x 63 feet. It is three stories in height, the first story of which is constructed of rough field stone. The second story overhangs the stone work, and this in turn is surmounted by an overhanging roof, ornamented by two dormer windows on each side, north and south. The upper portion of the house is built of wood, and its exterior appearance is enhanced by the handsome shingles with which the walls and roof are covered. These are made from the celebrated red wood of California, which material, up to the present time, has been but little used in this section.” [Bar Harbor Record, 7 February 1900; p. 1, cols. 4–5.]
1904: owned by Charles Francis estate
1947: burned
Eegonos – Eden Street
Ellis Cottage – Cleftstone Road
Elsinore – east side of Cleftstone Road
designed by Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul of Boston
1893–1894: built for Hugh McMillan of Detroit
1904: owned by Hugh McMillan
later owned by Mrs. Henry F. Dimock
ca. 1945: torn down
Eno Cottage – ocean side of Eden Street, north of Duck Brook
1904: owned by Henry Lane Eno
Eyrie, The – Spring Street
designed by William Ralph Emerson of Boston
1881: built for Robert Amory
1904: owned by Robert Amory
later owned by Mrs. Augustus Thorndike, Amory’s daughter
[1899?] (September): burned
1900: rebuilt; “Rising from the summit of Amory hill stands the new ‘Eyrie,’ the beautiful summer home that Dr. Robert Amory of Boston, is erecting to take the place of the one destroyed by fire on the 7th day of last September. … The building is situated in about the same position as was the one that was burned and faces nearly east. It is a somewhat higher structure and thereby commands a more extensive view. It is built to represent three sides of an octogon [sic], presenting a front of about 55 feet, while the entire length is about 100 feet and the width 34 feet.” [Bar Harbor Record, 3 January 1900; p. 1]
1942: torn down
Fabbri Cottage – Eden Street
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
Fabian Cottage – Eden Street
designed by John Clark
1885–1886: built for R. L. Fabian
1887(?): tower added
1889: two-story addition
1975: torn down
Fairview – Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Mrs. John Harrison
Far Niente – West Street
1904: owned by William B. Rice estate
Far View – Eden Street
designed by Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul of Boston
1909: built for Philip Livingston
1938: purchased by Mary Roberts Rinehart; article in The Bar Harbor Times, 5 May 1938, page 1, column 5
1947: burned
Wonderview Motel built on site
Faraway – north side of Eagle Lake Road
1885: designed by Furness, Evans & Co. of Philadelphia
[year?]: built for Mrs. John Harrison
1904: owned by John Harrison
Fernhill – Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Miss Dorothea C. and Miss Fanny Norris
Foster Cottage – High Street
Four Acres – ocean side of Eden Street
designed by Chapman & Fraser of Boston
1903: built for Alexander J. Cassatt of Philadelphia
1904: owned by Alexander J. Cassatt
1925: purchased by Edward T. Stotesbury of Philadelphia
remodeling design by Magaziner, Eberhard & Harris;
[year?]: renamed Wingwood House
1953: torn down
Franzen Cottage – The Field
Frost Cottage – southeast corner of West Street and Bridge Street
1904: owned by S. Weir Mitchell
Geranium (Cottage) – east side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
Glen Eyrie – west side of Eden Street, north side of Duck Brook
1902: built for John B. Henderson of Missouri
1904: owned by John B. Henderson
ca. 1933: torn down
Grace Cottage – Mount Desert Street
Grant, H. A., Cottage – east end of Albert Street (now [2014] Albert Meadow)
1869: built for H. A. Grant
1904: owned by Mrs. H. A. Grant
2009 September 23: Grant Park (site of cottage), plaque
Graycote – see Graywood Cottage
Graywood Cottage – east side of Holland Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. Caroline S. Leffingwell
[date?]: renamed Graycote and converted to an inn
2014 February 3: cottage with sign, northwest view
Green Lodge – Amory Lane
1904: owned by Robert Amory
Greencourt – Prospect Avenue
1904: owned by Miss Charlotte Pendleton
later owned by:
Mrs. Crawford Clark
Seward Webb
Bruce French
Greenlawn – 123 West Street; north (ocean) side
1887: built for Mr. and Mrs. William Rice of Massachusetts
1896: purchased by Mrs. William Lawrence Green
1904: owned by Mrs. William Lawrence Green
2009 November 22: cottage
2014: extant
Greenway Court – lower Main Street
designed by Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul of Boston
1910: built for Francis Burton Harrison
1947: burned
Greystone – west side of Eden Street, south side of Duck Brook
1904: owned by Mrs. M. Cary Lea
Greywood
Guelph – West Street
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mr. Francis Phelps is with his father, Prof. Austin Phelps, at his cottage on West street.” (p. 1, col. 3)
1904: owned by Austin Phelps and Mary A. Phelps; property extended from West Street to Frenchman Bay, and was bounded on the west by Bridge Street and on the east by “The Swimming Club”
Guptill Cottage – Roberts Avenue
Guthrie Cottage – Bloomfield Road
Guy’s Cliff – east side of Eden Street
designed by W. Jordan
ca. 1870: built for Charles T. How
1904: owned by Mrs. Edwin C. Cushman of Newport, Rhode Island
1925 July: purchased by John J. O’Brien; announcement in The Bar Harbor Times, Wednesday, 15 July 1925, page 1, column 4
1926: purchased by James Byrne
remodeled by office of Guy Lowell
willed to Oblate Fathers
purchased by Bernard Cough
purchased by College of the Atlantic
Hackmatack Hulls Cove
1904: owned by Miss Helen Beach
Hardy Cottage – east side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
Hare Forest – see Ledge Cliff
Hauterive – east side of Eden Street
1904: owned by Mrs. Miles B. Carpenter
1907 November 6: “Further up Eden Street [from The Turrets] Mrs. Miles B. Carpenter is going to have a big seawall built this year at Hauterive.” (The Bar Harbor Record, 6 November 1907, p. 1, col 3)
2008 April 9: capstone
Higgins Cottage, Alcenus – Holland Avenue
Higgins Cottage, S. N. – The Field
Highbrook – corner of Highbrook Road and Eden Street
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1881: built for Mary Leeds (Mrs. James Leeds) of Boston
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Miss F. M. Gibbs, who was staying with Mrs. Leeds at Highbrook, has removed to the Newport House.” (p. 1, col. 3)
1904: owned by Mrs. James Leeds
1925: purchased by Mrs. A. Mansfield Patterson
1947: burned
Highfield – west side of Cleftstone Road, How’s Park
1904: owned by Mrs. Nathan Matthews
1947: burned
Highseas – Schooner Head Road
1911: designed by Frederick L. Savage for Rudolph E. Brunnow
2014 May 11: cottage
Hillcrest
1904: owned by Thomas H. Hubbard
Hillhurst
1904: owned by Mrs. W. W. Seeley
Hilltop – Eagle Lake Road
Hinch Cottage – High Street
Homewood – south side of Eagle Lake Road
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1883: built
[year?]: purchased by Mrs. M. D. Sanders of Philadelphia
1904: owned by Mrs. M. D. Sanders estate
later owned by Hugh Scott of Philadelphia
1947: burned
Honfleur House – Hulls Cove
designed by John Clark
1896: built for Herbert Parsons of New York
1904: owned by Mrs. Herbert Parsons
later owned by Sumner Welles
1964: torn down
Ingleside – west of Kebo Street, along north side of road leading to/from Thirlstane
1904: owned by William Lawrence
Ingraham Cottage – High Street
Islecote – Ogden Point, east side of lower Main Street; referred to as the “Schieffelin Cottage” in a 1902 newspaper account of its construction
designed by A. W. Longfellow
1901–1902: built for George Washington Vanderbilt. “The Schieffelin cottage which Mr. Vanderbilt is building on the point of land to the south of that occupied by his own cottage, is an imposing structure commanding an extensive view of the ocean on the east and of the mountains on the south and west. This house will be occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Jay Schieffelin and family, whose name it bears.” [It was called the “Schieffelin Cottage” in the Bar Harbor Record, 22 January 1902; p. 1, col. 3.; Mrs. Schieffelin was a niece of George Washington Vanderbilt.]
“In size the house is 45 x 127 feet, situated east and west with the front facing the south. The design is irregular and picturesque, and the second story overgangs. … The house is four stories in height including the basement and finished attic. There is no cellar proper, the lower floor being almost wholly above ground. … The first story is mostl stone with ashlar walls of warm and varying colors, and the joints are laid large. The building is surmounted by a steep hip roof broken up with numerous ridges and gables of various heights.” [Bar Harbor Record, 22 January 1902; p. 1, col. 3]
1904: owned by George Washington Vanderbilt
1940: torn down
Italian Villa, The – west side of Eden Street
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1886: built for George Harris of East Machias
1904: owned by Mrs. George Harris
later owned by F. McCormick-Goodhart of Washington, D.C.
1947: burned
Jacobs Well – southeast corner of Eden Street and West Street
1904: owned by L. T. Dickson estate
Kebo (Cottage)
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
Kedge, The – southwest corner of West and Bridge Streets
1904: owned by Mrs. J. M. P. Price
Keewaydin – west side of lower Main Street
designed by Lamb & Rich of New York
1898: built for Gardiner Sherman of New York
1904: owned by Gardner Sherman
1925: owned by Edward Porter May and Lucy (Conger) May (until Edward May’s death on 9 August 1927)
1927: owned by Lucy (Conger) May
1947: burned
Kenarden Lodge – along former portion of Shore Path (which ends now [2014] at Wayman Lane); driveway access from Barberry Lane
designed by Rowe and Baker of New York City
1892: built for John Stewart Kennedy
1904: owned by John Stewart Kennedy
1906 August 8 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mr. and Mrs. John S. Kennedy have decided to open their grounds to the public on Saturday afternoons in August from 3 to 6 o’clock. In order that the grounds may not be unduly crowded at any time they will limit the number to be admitted on each occasion to 100, and tickets of admission will be left at the office of the selectmen, where they may be had in order of application. Each ticket will admit but one person. Tickets for Saturday the 11th, will be ready for delivery on Thursday, next, and on each Thursday thereafter.” (p. 5, col. 1)
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
1933 May 9: purchased by Ethel M. Dorrance
1960: torn down
1970s: new cottage built on site for Tristram Colket
Knoll, The – south side of Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by H. C. Wilkins estate
1947: burned
Kossuth – northwest corner of Mount Desert Street and Holland Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. Frank Fremont-Smith
Kragmyr – Cleftstone Road
La Rochelle – 127 West Street (north side)
La Selva
1904: owned by Mrs. A. J. Davis
2007 September 17: capstone
2011 December 12: ocean side [photo by Doug Tuttle]
2011 December 12: Route 3 side [photo by Doug Tuttle]
Ladd Bungalow – Mountain Avenue
Larchsea east side of lower Main Street, shared driveway with Beachcroft
1904: owned by Mrs. John Markoe
Ledge, The – along former portion of Shore Path (which ends now [2014] at Wayman Lane); driveway access from Barberry Lane
1904: owned by Mrs. Lucien Carr
Ledge Cliff – east side of Schooner Head Road; in 1904, the third parcel south of Bear Brook—the first (on which Chatwold stood) owned by Joseph Pulitzer and the second (with no buildings) owned by Robert P. Bowler.
designed by Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul of Boston
1899–1900: built by Edward B. Mears for Lorenzo N. Kettle; “The house is situated nearly north and south, 106 feet in length by 36 feet in depth. It is constructed of wood, and the walls and roof are shingled. On the water front are two handsome gables, and two dormer windows all being decorated with fancy scroll work in pine. On the west and south are four gables finished in plaster. The center gable on the west side is an enormous affair reaching nearly to the ground. Through this gable light is admitted to the staircase within.” [Bar Harbor Record, Wednesday evening, February 7, 1900; p. 1, col. 3. The description in the paper continues at length.]
1904: owned by Lorenzo N. Kettle, wool merchant of Weston, Massachusetts, who died before June 1912
1926 (September 8): purchased from trustees of Kettle’s estate by Pauline K. Palmer, of Chicago, Illinois, who changed name to Hare Forest (Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 605, pages 551–553)
1947: burned
Ledge Hollow – southwest corner of Wayman Lane and Barberry Lane
1904: owned by T. M. Rotch
Ledge Lawn
1876: built by W. Jordan for Miss Mary Shannon
1902: torn down
Lee Cottage – West Street
Lee Cottage – Hulls Cove
Leeward – West Street
Little Lookout – Eagle Lake Road
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mr. Gardner Sherman’s little daughter is staying with her grandmother, Mrs. Charles Gordon, at the Little Lookout on Eagle Lake Road.” (p. 1, col. 3)
Llangollen – north side of Eagle Lake Road
1896: built for Charles Jackson
1904: owned by Mrs. Charles Carroll Jackson
later owners (in turn): Mrs. William Blake, Mrs. Duer Baker, Prince Mahmet Burhaneddin
1947: burned
Locuusts, The – Shore Path
Lombard Cottage – east side of Eden Street
1904: owned by Miss S. S. Lombard
Lookout, The – north side of Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Mrs. Moncure Robinson
Lynam Cottage – Federal Street
McMillan Cottage
Maisonette – West Street
Mare Vista – Atlantic Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. T. B. Musgrave
Marigold Cottage – north side of Albert Street (now [2014] Albert Meadow)
1887 March 17 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mrs. J. M. Cary’s cottage, Marigold, will have an addition billet to it this spring.” (p. 3, col. 1)
1904: owned by Miss Jane M. Cary
2014: extant
McKay Cottage
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
Meadow Brook – Schooner Head Road
Meadowridge (also Meadow Ridge) – north side of Albert Street (now [2014] Albert Meadow)
1881: built by Albert Higgins
1885: purchased by Parke Godwin
1904: owned by Parke Godwin estate
later owned by Fred Jellison
later owned by Alice Kiaer
ca. 1955: torn down
Miller Cottage – Mount Desert Street [#79 in 1926]
Minto Cottage – The Field
Mira Monte – north side of Mount Desert Street
1864: built for Orlando Ash
1904: owned by Mrs. H. C. Chapman
Miramiche – Cleftstone Road
Mizzentop – Cleftstone Road
designed by H. L. Putnam of Boston
1883–1884: built for Louisa Dumaresq Hunt (née Perkins), widow of artist William Morris Hunt
1895 (October 15): purchased by Sarah Lord McCormick by Louisa D. Hunt (Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 294, pages 379–382)
1895 (October): alterations begun; “Messrs. Jordan & Paine began the work on the alterations last October and they have completely changed the interior and exterior appearances of the house.” (Bar Harbor Record, 15 April 1896, p. 1, col. 4)
plumbing: Leighton Davenport & Co.; mason: Mr. Wescott; grounds work: W. P. Blanchfield
1896 (April): “Mizzentop the newly altered house of Mr. R. Hall McCormick, of Chicago, is nearly finished and will be occupied by Mr. McCormick and his family in early June. … When the alterations are completed they will cost about $10,000.” (Bar Harbor Record, 15 April 1896, p. 1, col. 4)
1904: owned by Robert Hall McCormick (grandson of Cyrus McCormick)
1925 (December 26): purchased by Henry and Josephine Morgenthau (Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 598, pages 347–350 and 351–353)
1947: burned
2011 December 12: capstone [photo by Doug Tuttle]
Moorings, The – east side of Eden Street
1904: owned by Miss Mary Sharswood
Mossley Hall
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1882–1883: built for William B. Howard of Chicago
1904: owned by Mrs. William B. Howard
1947: burned (source: American Country Houses of the Gilded Age by Arnold Lewis, 978-0486243016)
Nannau – Lower Main Street
Nasturtium Cottage – Highbrook Road
1904: owned by Mrs. Edward McCauley
Okeden – east side of lower Main Street
1904: owned by David B. Ogden
Oldfarm – east side of lower Main Street
designed by Henry Richards
1878–1880: built for Charles Hazen Dorr of Boston
1904: owned by George Bucknam Dorr (son of Charles Hazen Dorr)
1951: torn down
2008 May 1: (formerly covered) terrace
Old Rectory
1904: owned by Christopher Starr Leffingwell estate
Parker Cottage
Pinchot Cottage – west side of Eden Street
1903: built for Amos Pinchot of New York (brother of Gifford Pinchot)
1947: burned
Pinehurst – southwest corner of Eagle Lake Road and Kebo Street
1904: owned by Mrs. M. D. Sanders estate
Pointe d’Acadie – Ogden Point, east side of lower Main Street
designed by Charles Coolidge Haight
1868–1869: built for Gouverneur Morris Ogden of New York and called Watersmeet
1889: purchased by George Washington Vanderbilt who renamed it
1904: owned by George Washington Vanderbilt
later owned by George H. McFadden of Philadelphia
1956: torn down
Poplars, The – north side of Atlantic Avenue
1904: owned by Rufus E. Shapley
Poplars, The – northwest corner of Mount Desert Street and High Street
1899 (April 5): Harden house and Getchell stables purchased by Lewis A. Roberts, a retired book publisher of Boston, and torn down. [Hancock Registry of Deeds book 336, pages 31–35]
1899–1900: designed by Goddard & Hunt, architects; “On the corner of High and Mount Desert streets Mr. L. A. Roberts has erected a second house [the first being what is now Thornhedge at the corner of Mount Desert Street and Roberts Avenue] which has been named ‘The Poplars.’ It is a three story building 33 x 78 feet in size with an English basement. It is built of wood and rough stucco work with rough timber trimmings. An overhanging second story ornamented with projecting gables, with dormer windows in the roof complete the general exterior description.” [Bar Harbor Record, 21 March 1900; p. 1, col. 4]
1904: owned by Lewis A. Roberts estate and by that time called “Stratford House”
1920 (November 8): purchased from estate of Lewis A. Roberts by Margaret Riviere Pendleton [Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 553, pages 471–472. This is just the Stratford House parcel; i.e., the eastern portion of the parcel purchased in 1899 by Lewis A. Roberts.]
1937 (April 24): purchased from Margaret Riviere Pendleton by Silas A. Coffin and Phyllis C. Coffin [Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 655, pages 523–523]
Primrose Cottage Mount Desert Street
1904: owned by C. S. Leffingwell estate
Redwood – along former portion of Shore Path (which ends now [2014] at Wayman Lane); driveway access from Barberry Lane
1904: owned by C. J. Morrill estate
[date?]: cottage (from image in 1919 publication Who’s Who at the leading Watering Resorts in Maine, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
Reef Point – near Shore Path; accessed (in 1904) via a driveway from east end of Hancock Street
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1883: built for Mary C. (Mrs. Cadwalader) Jones (mother of Beatrix (Jones) Farrand)
1904: owned by Mrs. Cadwalader Jones
1955: torn down
Reverie Cove – south side of Prospect Avenue
1892: designed by Frederick L. Savage
1904: owned by Mrs. John D. Jones
later owned by:
Miss S. Hewitt
DeForest Grant
[…] Blanchard
Rexcote – north side of Prospect Avenue
1904: owned by Mrs. Louise Este King
Richardson (Cottage)
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
Rock Brook – Eden Street
2007 September 4: capstone
Rockburn(e) – Woodbury Road; west side of Devon Road
1904: owned by Mrs. A. D. Addison
Rock Hurst – Mount Desert Street
Rocklyn – Eden Street
1881–1882: built for James Hinch
1904: owned by Phillip Livingston
1947: burned
2007 September 4: steps, capstone
Royeden – Atlantic Avenue
Saltair – 121 West Street (north side)
1887: built for William B. Rice
1896: purchased by A. Bleecker Banks, article in Bar Harbor Record, Tuesday, 25 August 1896, page 4, column 5
1904: owned by A. Bleecker Banks
later owned by:
Mrs. M. Langhorne
Mrs. Edward Browning
Keith Barnes
Curtis Symonds
2009 November 22: cottage/inn
2014: extant (as Saltair Inn)
Schieffelin Cottage – see Islecote
Sea Fox – east side of Eden Street
1904: owned by Alanson Tucker
Sea Urchins – east side of Eden Street
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mr. Burton Harrison has arrived and is staying with his family at the Sea Urchins.” (p. 1, col. 3)
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mrs. Burton Harrison and family will visit the Provinces during the month of August, when Secretary Whitney will occupy their cottage, the Sea Urchins.” (p. 1, col. 4)
1904: owned by Mrs. Burton Harrison
later owned by:
E. Victor L[…]
Michael Pulitzer
Frank Collins
College of the Atlantic
Seacroft – north side of Albert Street (now [2014] Albert Meadow)
1904: owned by Mrs. Robert B. Bowler
2009 November 16: cottage
2014: extant
Shore Acres along Shore Path; accessed in 1904 from Main Street
designed by William Ralph Emerson
1881: built for Haskett Derby of Boston
1904: owned by Haskett Derby
1914: inherited by Mrs. Haskett Derby
about 1957: torn down
Silver Birches – Eden Street
Sonogee – east side of Route 3, north of village of Bar Harbor
1903: built for Henry Lane Eno
later owned by Frederick Vanderbilt
1927: purchased by A. Atwater Kent; article in The Bar Harbor Times, Wednesday, 27 April 1927, page 1, column 6
1976: became a nursing facility
South Kebo Cottage
Spruce Lodge – Kebo Street
Stanton Cottage – corner of Eden Street and Eagle Lake Road
1904: owned by Mrs. M. W. Stanton
Stanwood – Highbrook Road
designed by William M. Camac of Philadelphia
1885–1886: built for James G. Blaine
date?: photograph
1904: owned by James G. Blaine estate
later owned by Walter Damrosch
1947: burned
Steepways – Cleftstone Road
1904: owned by Mrs. William Todd Helmuth
Stone Cliff(e) – east side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by Morris K. Jesup
Stratford House, The – see Poplars, The (at the corner of High Street and Mount Desert Street)
Strath-Eden
1894: built for Ann Dennison
later owned by Clifford Remington
1947: burned
Strawberry Hill House – Strawberry Hill
designed by Rotch & Tilden of Boston
1889: built for J. Frederick May of Washington, D.C.
1904: owned by Mrs. J. Frederick May
1947: burned
Studio, The
1904: owned by Frederick Amory
Sturgis Cottage southeast corner of Mount Desert Street and Amory Lane
1904: owned by Mrs. A. Y. Stewart
Suminsby Cottage – Atlantic Avenue
Sunnyside
1904: owned by Frank Fremont-Smith
Sunset Cottage – corner of West and Bridge Streets
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
Talleyrand – Kebo Street
designed by DeGrasse Fox
1887–1888: built for DeGrasse Fox
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
1947: burned
Tanglewold – east side of Kebo Street
designed by DeGrasse Fox
1888: built for DeGrasse Fox
1904: owned by Malvern Hotel and Land Improvement Company
1906: purchased by Alfred M. Coats of Providence, Rhode Island
1917: purchased[?] by A. Murray Young
1947: burned
Teviot (Cottage) – west side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by John H. Livingston
Thingvalla (or Thyngvalla) – west side of Kebo Street
1904: owned by Henry R. Hatfield
Thirlstane – Hamilton Hill
Thornhedge – northeast corner of Mount Desert Street and Roberts Avenue
1900: built for Lewis A. Roberts, a retired book publisher from Boston
1904: owned by Lewis A. Roberts estate
1976: opened as a Bed and Breakfast
Tides, The – 119 West Street (north side)
1887: built for Mr. and Mrs. William Rice
1904: owned by William B. Rice estate
22 November 2009: cottage (view from west), cottage (view from east), plaque
2014: extant
Toy Cottage – Stephens Lane
Trevor Cottage – see Whileaway
Triangle, The – northeast corner of Eden Street and Mount Desert Street
1904: owned by John H. Livingston et al.
Tullibardine – corner of Bloomfield Road and Devon Road
1904: owned by Miss M. H. Guthrie
Turrets, The – 105 Eden Street (east side)
1904: owned by John J. Emery
1907 November 6: “At The Turrets, Mr. John J. Emery’s place, Shea Brothers are building, and have nearly finished the concrete walls and basement work for a large greenhouse, directly in from of the barn, and between it and the street.” (The Bar Harbor Record, 6 November 1907, p. 1, col 3)
2008 July 13: entrance side, ocean side
2014: extant
Uferheim – east side of Eden Street
1904: owned by U. H. Crocker estate
Ullikana – The Field
1904: owned by Mrs. Alpheus Hardy
Van Doren Cottage – Hulls Cove
designed by William Poindexter & Co. of Washington, D.C.
1887–1888: built for Mary Van Doren
later owned by Juila and Guy Whiting of Washington, D.C.
1969: torn down
Villa Mary – Eden Street
1904: owned by F. H. Johnson
Wayside – near Shore Path; accessed in 1904 via a driveway from east end of Atlantic Avenue, the driveway shared with Eden Hall and Edgemere
1904: owned by Frances E. (Mrs. Thomas B.) Musgrave
Wazee-Lo-Wan – Cleftstone Road
1896: built
1904: owned by Mrs. William C. Allison
1947: burned
2009: post and capstone [photo by Kenneth G. D’Aurizio]
Weir, The – West Street
Westfield – West Street
1904: owned by William B. Rice estate
Westover
1904: owned by Mrs. Jesse Hoyt
Whileaway – Ogden Point, east side of Lower Main Street; referred to as the “Trevor Cottage” in a 1902 newspaper account of its construction
1901–1902: built for George Washington Vanderbilt; At the same time that Vanderbilt was having the Schieffelin Cottage (later called Islecote) built, he was having a second cottage built, this one called the Trevor Cottage and to be occupied by Mrs. J. B. Trevor and family of New York. The local newspaper reported at the time that “[t]he frame of this house is well up and the roof is going on. When completed it will be an imposing structure. No elaborate attempt at ornamentation has been made and the effect is simple but dignified. In size the house is 47 x 98 feet, two story in height, surmounted by a hip roof which is enlivened by the introduction of dormer windows. … The principal feature of the front elevation, and placed in about the center, is a large circular tower which is carried well up into the roof. [Bar Harbor Record, 22 January 1902, p. 1, col. 4, and p. 4, col. 2.]
1904: owned by George Washington Vanderbilt
Wildacre – north side of Cromwell Harbor Road
1904: owned by Mrs. George S. Robbins
Wingcote – Woodbury Road
Wingwood House – see Four Acres
Witch Cliff – east side of Eden Street
designed by Bruce Price
1880: built
1904: owned by Mrs. A. F. Manning
[date?]: rebuilt by H. H. Ellison
later owned by Harold Collier
later owned by Helmut Weber
Wood Cottage – High Street
Wood Lea – Salisbury Cove
[year?]: built for Mr. and Mrs. Fulton J. Redman
1926: purchased by Edward Porter May (excerpt from The Bar Harbor Times article of 22 September 1926, p. 1, col. 4)
Woodbine – 116 West Street
Woodlands – lower Main Street
designed by Irving John Gill
1903–1904: built for Louis B. McCagg of New York
later owned by Edith (Pulitzer) Moore (Mrs. William Moore)
1947: burned
Wyandotte – south side of Hancock Street
1904: owned by Mrs. John Biddle Porter
Yellow Cottage – south side of The Field [a street]
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Mr. Jack Linzee has been visiting his mother, Mrs. T. C. A. Linzee, at the Yellow House in the Field.” (p. 1, col. 3)
1904: owned by Miss Torrey and Miss Linzee
Yule’s Craig – Hulls Cove


 

Mount Desert

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Alders – Cottage Street [now South Shore Road], Northeast Harbor
designed by John E. Clark of Bar Harbor for S. D. Sargeant
Ancestral, The – Northeast Harbor
1880: land purchased from Augustus Chase Savage
designed by Robert Swain Peabody
built by Augustus Chase Savage for Charles W. Eliot
Anchor-to-Wind – Seal Harbor
Anchorage, The – Seal Harbor
1909 July 7: listed in “Cottage Directory” in The Bar Harbor Record
Anchorage, The – Crowninshield Point, Seal Harbor
designed by Wallace K. Harrison
1939: built
owned by [built for?] Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller
14 August 1979: transferred via will (Hancock County Registry of Deeds 1357:215) to Margaretta Fitler Rockefeller
30 August 1979: purchased by Walter B. Ford II and Josephine [F.?] Ford (Hancock County Registry of Deeds 1360:440)
Beau Geste – Northeast Harbor
Binnacle, The – Barr Hill Road, Seal Harbor
Blueberry Cliff – Northeast Harbor
Blueberry Ledge
designed by Peabody & Stearns of Boston
1881: built for Charles Eliot family (cost: $6840)
Breezes – Cottage Street [now South Shore Road], Northeast Harbor
Byways – Seal Harbor
Cairn House – Seal Harbor
Cedar Cliff – Seal Harbor
Clement Cottage – Seal Harbor
Cochrane Cottage – Northeast Harbor
Coffee Pot – Northeast Harbor
Conies, The – Seal Harbor
Cove End – Northeast Harbor
Craigstone – Rowland Road, Seal Harbor
designed by Isaac H. Green Jr. of Sayville, NY, for Henry A. Rowland
Cranberry Lodge – see Harbor Cottage
Digby Lodge – Northeast Harbor
Eastholm
1901–1902: built for Mr. and Mrs. Richard March Hoe
Eastpoint
designed by Duncan Candler
1909: built for Charlotte Augusta (Rhodes) Hanna (Mrs. Marcus Hanna)
Eastward Way – Northeast Harbor
Edgecliff – Seal Harbor
Edgewood – Cottage Street [now South Shore Road], Northeast Harbor
Escale, La – Northeast Harbor
Eyrie, The
designed by Marcus T. Reynolds of Albany, NY
1897–1899: built for Samuel Fessenden Clarke
1910: purchased by John D. Rockefeller Jr.
1915: Duncan Candler hired to design an expansion
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
1963: torn down
Falt House – Northeast Harbor
ca. 1895: built
Felsmere – Rowland Road, Seal Harbor
designed by Grosvenor Atterbury
1901–1902: built by Asa Hodgkins and Sons of Bar Harbor for Edward Cushman Bodman
Fieldwood – Seal Harbor
Firwood – Seal Harbor
Folie, La – Seal Harbor
Forest Ledge – Seal Harbor
Fraley Cottage
1901: designed by Frederick L. Savage
Glengariff – Seal Harbor
1891: designed by Isaac H. Green Jr. of Sayville, NY, for George Borwick Cooksey
August 1909: purchased by Ernest B. Dane, who had it torn down and had a new Glengariff built (completed in 1911)
Good Hope – Northeast Harbor
Gray Rock – Seal Harbor
Gray Rock – Northeast Harbor
designed by Frederick L. Savage
1912–1913: built for William S. Grant Jr. of Philadelphia
Graycliff
designed by Isaac H. Green Jr. of Sayville, NY, for Eugene S. Bristol
1895–1896: built
Grey Pine – Northeast Harbor
Gulls Way – Northeast Harbor
Harbor Cottage – Northeast Harbor
owned by Augustus C. Savage
name changed to Cranberry Lodge
Harbor Head – Northeast Harbor
Heimburg, Die – Seal Harbor
Hidden House – Seal Harbor
Hillcrest – Rowland Road, Seal Harbor
Hillside – Seal Harbor
Homestead
1885: designed by John E. Clark of Bar Harbor for Daniel Kimball
Ilfracombe – Seal Harbor
Indian Head Cottage – Manchester Point, Northeast Harbor
designed by Frederick L. Savage for Ansel L. Manchester
used as a small summer hotel
Immensee – Seal Harbor
Journey’s End – Northeast Harbor
Juniper Ledge – Northeast Harbor
Keewaydin – Cooksey Drive, Seal Harbor
1896: designed by Isaac H. Green Jr. of Sayville, NY, for Edward K. and Mary (Dows) Dunham
1897: built
1898: garden designed by Beatrix Farrand
1910: brick terrace added; designed by architect Duncan Candler
Kenjockety – Northeast Harbor
(Daniel) Kimball House – Northeast Harbor
later named Petite Plaisance
Ledge, The – Smallidge Point, Northeast Harbor
1891: designed by Frederick L. Savage for William Warren and Ellen Twistleton (Parkman) Vaughan of Hallowell, Maine
Lions Ledge – Seal Harbor
Lookout – Seal Harbor
Lower Ledge – Northeast Harbor
Magnum Donum – Northeast Harbor
1881, spring: built
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Bishop Doane and family are expected at their cottage at Northeast Harbor, on Saturday evening.” (p. 1, col. 3)
owned by William C. Doane
2011 December 12: cottage [photo by Doug Tuttle]
Malmor – Seal Harbor
McBridge Cottage – Northeast Harbor
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Henry R. Dalton and family of Boston, are occupying the McBride cottage at Northeast Harbor.” (p. 1, col. 3)
Meadow Cottage – Seal Harbor
Miradero – Seal Harbor
designed by Grosvenor Atterbury
1901: built for Christian A. Herter
Nantibi – Seal Harbor
Otter’s Nest – Otter Creek
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Lieut. Auliek Palmer was at his cottage the Otter’s Nest, at Otter Creek, last week. Mrs. Palmer is detained by sickness.” (p. 1, col. 3)
Over Sea – Seal Harbor
Overbrook – Seal Harbor
Overcliff – Northeast Harbor
Over-edge – Northeast Harbor
owned by Daniel Coit Gilman
Oversea – Seal Harbor
Ox Ledge – Seal Harbor
Passage West – Seal Harbor
Perch, The – Seal Harbor
Petite Plaisance – see (Daniel) Kimball House
(J. D.) Phillips Cottage
1889: built
Pine Ledge – Seal Harbor
Points of View – Seal Harbor
Pyne Cottage – Cottage Street [now South Shore Road], Northeast Harbor
Ravenscleft – Cooksey Drive, Seal Harbor
designed by Peabody & Stearns
1901: built for James Ford Rhodes and wife Anne Card Rhodes
2004: purchased by Gretchen LeGré
Reath Cottage – Northeast Harbor
Reef Point – Northeast Harbor
Rock End Way – Northeast Harbor
Roserne – Northeast Harbor
1890: land purchased
designed by Frederick L. Savage for Rev. Cornelius B. Smith
1891: completed
2011 December 12: cottage [photo by Doug Tuttle]
Saheda – 109 Cooksey Drive, Seal Harbor
Scull Cottage
1899: designed by Frederick L. Savage
Sea Change – Northeast Harbor
Seabeach – Seal Harbor
Seabench – Seal Harbor
Seaward West – Northeast Harbor
Shawondasee – Rowland Road, Seal Harbor
Skylands – Seal Harbor
designed by Duncan Candler
1923–1925: built by Byron W. Candage and Son for Edsel and Eleanor Ford; landscape architect: Jens Jensen
[date?]: cottage (from image on old postcard, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
21 August 1997: purchased by Martha Stewart (Hancock County Registry of Deeds book 2679, pages 348–366)
Somes (George A.) Cottage – Somesville
1881 July 14: “Geo. A. Somes, of Somesville, has sold his cottage to Capt. Samuel Nash of Steuben, who is soon to occupy it.” (Mount Desert Herald, 14 July 1881, p. 3, col. 1)
Stone Acre(s) – Northeast Harbor
1887 July 14 issue of Bar Harbor Record: “Erastus Corning and family arrived at Northeast Harbor last week, and are now occupying their handsome new cottage, Stone Acre.” (p. 1, col. 3)
[date?]: cottage (from image in 1919 publication Who’s Who at the leading Watering Resorts in Maine, contributed by Doug Tuttle)
Stoneleigh – Seal Harbor
1882: built for Rufus R. Thomas of Philadelphia
Stonycroft – Seal Harbor
Sunnieholme – Northeast Harbor
Sunset Ledge – Northeast Harbor
Sunset Shore designed by Frederick L. Savage
1904: built for Miss E. P. Sohier of Boston
Sylvanora – Seal Harbor
Tenedos – Northeast Harbor
Thuya Lodge – Northeast Harbor
land purchased from Augustus Chase Savage
1880: construction started by Augustus Chase Savage for Joseph Curtis
Tower Cottage – Seal Harbor
Tranquility Base – Northeast Harbor
Tree Tops – Northeast Harbor
Tree Tops – Cooksey Drive, Seal Harbor
Villa Maria – Northeast Harbor
Wabenaki – Seal Harbor
designed by Duncan Candler
1906–1907: built by Byron W. Candage and Sons for George Stebbins
Wanakiwin – 93 Cooksey Drive, Seal Harbor
Wayside – Seal Harbor
Westacre – Northeast Harbor
Westward Way – South Shore Road, Northeast Harbor
designed by Peabody & Stearns of Boston
built for Mrs. W. T. Blodgett
Westwinds – Northeast Harbor
Wild Cliff
1901–1902: designed and built by Charles A. Candage for Alexander Mackay-Smith
Willows, The – Northeast Harbor
Windward
1893–1897: built for Mr. and Mrs. Henry Parkman
Wise Acre – Seal Harbor
Wood Bungalow – Northeast Harbor
Ye Haven
designed by John E. Clark of Bar Harbor
1882–1883: built for James and Margaret (Doane) Gardiner of Albany, New York


 

Southwest Harbor

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Dickey Cottage
built by W. P. Dickey and Col. Augustus B. Farnham of Bangor, Maine
Edgecliff
designed by William A. Bates of New York
1885–1887: built for Prof. Samuel M. and Mrs. Annie (Sawyer) Downs of Andover, Massachusetts
Fox Dens – back shore of Clark Point
1908: owned by Henry Rand
Grand Pre – Fernald Point
1916–1917: built by Robie M. Norwood Jr. for Frances Scott
operated as a teahouse for a few years
Highland Cottage – Manset
1888: built by P. H. Stratton of Ellsworth, Maine, for Drs. Alexander and Abby Fulton of Ellsworth
Indian Lot Cottage
1925: built for George A. Rhoads
2010 September 12: sign; cottage
Kaighn Cottage
1892: built for Robert Kaighn
Sleepy Hollow
built for Albert W. Bee
Squirrelhurst
designed by Lois Lilley Howe
1901–1902: built by Clark and Manchester of Northeast Harbor and Norris of Ellsworth for William L. Underwood


 

Tremont

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